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Consumer Economics

Consumer Economics
Professor Guy Pascale

Semester: Spring 2012
ID#: 50:220:303:01
Index #: 77292
Room: Fine Arts 242
Office Hours: M-W 2:00-4:20 and by appointment
Phone: (856) 225-6136
E-mail: pascale@camden.rutgers.edu

Texts:

All materials available on SAKAI.

Overview of the Course:

This course is designed to expose students to the important terms and concepts related to the subject of consumer economics. Once completed students should understand the role consumer play in the economy, their priorities and the choices they make, consumer rights and protections, large expenditure decisions, and the role consumers play in the national economy

Grading:

During the semester, there will be two exams and a final. The exams only encompass material covered from the previous exam. The first test occurs on 3/5 and the second test occurs on 4/30. The final is cumulative and occurs on a date to be determined. The exams are worth 20% and the final is worth 30% of your grade. The exams and final consist of a mixture multiple choice and problems.

All electronic devices must be turned off during exams.

Attendance is worth 10% of the final grade.

A ten-page paper is also required. It counts for 20% of the final grade and is due on 4/16. The paper must be submitted via e-mail attachment as a Microsoft Word document. The topic must relate to consumer economics and be approved by the professor. Students may hand in a draft of their paper prior to 4/2. Comments and suggestions will be returned to students in the order that they are received. Late papers will cause a substantial reduction in a student’s paper grade.

Test1

Test2

Paper

Final

Attendance

Total

20%

20%

20%

30%

10%

100%

There are no makeup exams. Individuals who miss an exam will have their final exam weighted to include the missed exam. Thus, a student missing an exam will have the final count as 50% of their final grade.

There is no extra creditfor this course.

Cheating: THE UNIVERSITY HAS A WELL DEFINED POLICY ON CHEATING AND
ACADEMIC DISHONESTY. IN SUMMARY, DON’T DO IT.

Class Room Etiquette:

Cell Phones must be turned off during class.

School policy allows for the removal of any student who is a disruption in the classroom. A cell phone ringing in class constitutes a disruption and will adversely impact your final grade.

Course Outline

Part I: Getting Started, Priorities, and Choices
Section 1.1: Introduction and Consumers
Section 1.2: The Marketplace and Negotiation
Section 1.3: Household Accounts
Section 1.4: Routine and Durable Purchases
Section 1.5: Borrowing, Risk, and Uncertainty
Section 1.6: Saving and Investing
Section 1.7: Gains From International Trade

Part II: Consumer Rights and Large Expenditure Decisions
Section 2.1: Consumer Protection: History and Today’s System
Section 2.2: Economic Underpinnings for Consumer Policy
Section 2.3: Expenditures: Housing, Cars, and College
Section 2.4: Expenditures: The Green Way, Healthcare, Retirement, and Death
Section 2.5: National Consumption Measurement and Determination
Section 2.6: Consumers and Government Spending